An event triggered from a landslide and I created a 1,700 foot wave. Five deaths were recorded, but property damage was minimal because there were few cities or towns nearby. Like this article? The wave itself would not have reached this height without external, that is, non-water bodies. It was 1,700 feet or 520 meters, almost twice the height of the Eiffel Tower. It was 1,700 feet, or 520 meters- almost twice the height of the Eiffel Tower. The pioneer of extreme surfing is the legendary Laird Hamilton, who, with a group of friends in Hawaii, figured out how to board suicidally large waves of 70 and 80 feet.

A fisherman and his son lived to tell about the experience. On the night of July 7th, 1958 the world’s largest recorded Tsunami engorged Alaska's Lituya bay, located about 250 miles west of Juneau. The red arrow shows the location of the landslide, and the yellow arrow shows the location of the high point of the wave sweeping over the headland. Watch Mysteries at the Museum: Shark Chaser, Haunted Harmony and 1,700-Foot Wave from Season 16 at TVGuide.com World´s tallest wave hit Alaska in 1958 A wall of water 1,700 feet tall raced through Lituya Bay in July 1958.

The resulting crash of rock into water caused the largest wall of water in human history. A tsunami as it normally happens, and against which such relations of tallest and biggest should be related or at least distinguished from, is a surge of water that rises because of the water that is already in its path. There is no way to tell how high/ inland a tsunami in this size would be. Damage from the 1958 Lituya Bay megatsunami can be seen in this oblique aerial photograph of Lituya Bay, Alaska as the lighter areas at the shore where trees have been stripped away. The tsunami was triggered by a magnitude 8.3 earthquake, which caused an enormous landslide along the Fairweather Fault. Don showcases a piece of top-secret military equipment developed by the first celebrity chef, a ghost that terrorized a popular music venue and a father-son duo who rode the tallest wave in the world. U.S. Navy via Getty Images . But 300 feet is a good average. Casey follows this unique tribe of peo­ple as they seek to conquer the holy grail of their sport, a 100­-foot wave.

2 MIN READ Editor, reporter, and radio producer Zachary Slobig has covered coastal issues for Outside, NPR, Los Angeles Times, and many others. “ On the night of July 7th, 1958, the world’s largest wave in recorded history engorged Alaska’s Lituya bay, located about 250 miles west of Juneau in the Gulf of Alaska. That was in a bay though so in the Cumbre Vieja event it would be very different. The Tsunami was triggered by a magnitude 8.3 earthquake caused an enormous landslide along the Fairweather Fault. With Steven Ablondi, Derrick Edwards, Danielle Hillanbrand, Megan Elizabeth May. Reply. It was 1,700 feet, or 520 meters- almost twice the height of the Eiffel Tower. July 9, 1958: Surf's Up, as 1700-Foot Wave Scours Alaskan Bay. If a 9.0 earthquake were to strike the Washington coast residents would have 15 to 20 minutes to prepare for a 60-foot-tall wave to hit Long Beach, Westport, Ocean Shores and … The deadly wave hurtled at jet speeds and wiped out everything within a four mile radius. Here's How a Tsunami Wave Can Rise 1,700 Feet. When the wave ran ashore, it snapped trees 1,700 feet upslope. The 1,720-foot monster that reared up as a result shot through the bay at 100 miles per hour (161 kilometers per hour), as Susan Casey details in her book, The Wave… The wave continued toward the southern Pacific; it would travel all the way to Hawaii. A great mid march view of Kentucky from this 1700 foot tower in Lagrange. Published: July 10, 2009; Views: 2,446; Share This Article:.... Tweet . Tsunamis look deceptively benign and are extraordinarily powerful. Jacqueline … July 9, 1958: Surf's Up, as 1,700-Foot Wave Scours Alaskan Bay Lituya Bay is a T-shaped fjord on the coast of the Alaskan Panhandle, west of Glacier Bay and about 120 miles west-northwest of Juneau. A 50-foot tsunami crashed into Unimak shortly after the quake, killing five people who lived in a lighthouse.