The train is not the cheapest means of transport of Japan (for example night buses are cheaper) but it is the most convenient and comfortable. Bullet trains are part of the Japanese experience, but if you haven’t got a JR Pass and just want a quick trip from Tokyo, you can always visit one of these popular spots! And rightly so – as someone who has made a lot of shinkansen journeys over the years, the experience never gets old.

Shinkansen (Bullet Train) Nothing screams "Japan" more loudly, than the super sleek shinkansen silently speeding out of Tokyo station bound for all corners of the country. In the coming years, Japan will build its first high-speed maglev line that is set to improve the existing system in all of these respects and more. The Shinkansen high-speed trains, known in English as bullet trains, may reach a speed of 320 km/h and offer punctuality, safety and comfort. Along with higher speeds, the Shinkansen has expanded in scale since 1964. The Japan Rail Pass provides unlimited travel on the entire national JR network, including the high speed bullet train lines. Japan's Current Bullet Train System Japan's network of bullet trains, called shinkansen in Japanese, first opened to connect Tokyo, Nagoya, and Osaka in 1964.

Home Japan Data Today, bullet train lines extend to nearly every corner of Japan and more are being built. Shinkansen (Bullet Train) Nothing screams "Japan" more loudly, than the super sleek shinkansen silently speeding out of Tokyo station bound for all corners of the country.

The Shinkansen was developed as the fastest and safest train in Japan, and is a symbol of Japan's industry. Here's everything you need to know, from the JR Pass to the best window seats, before you hop aboard. Japan's new bullet train, the Alfa-X, will whisk between Tokyo and Sapporo at up to 224 miles per hour. Japanese building codes do not regulate the distance between train lines and residential buildings due to high confidence in the engineering of the rail system. With a 20,000km network of lines and high performance, punctual trains, Japan is a train lover's paradise. Tourists may not realize, however, all that has gone into making this unique rapid transportation … Most visitors to Japan desire to experience the Shinkansen trains, which attain top speeds in excess of 320 kilometers per hour (199 miles per hour), although most regular trains don’t go beyond 300 km/h. Bullet train speed varies slightly but they usually travel between 150 mph and 187 mph (241 kph and 300 kph). The Japan Rail Pass is valid on the JR Express Trains, all Rapid and Local trains along the JR lines, JR local buses, the JR Miyajima ferry, as well as airport transfers like the Narita express and the Haruka express.

On top of that, while most railway, bus and ferry companies publish their timetables online, few offer good English language resources.

How long does delivery take? Japan's bullet train (shinkansen) is a must-do experience. Japan's bullet train network is famous worldwide for its speed, safety, and reliability. Japan’s bullet train is a people mover like no other, ferrying millions of passengers between cities in a quick, convenient and punctual transport system. The bullet train, or “Shinkansen”, is a type of passenger train which operates on Japan’s high-speed railway network. The railway high-speed railway lines in Japan are called Shinkansen (新幹線) connecting the major cities on the islands of Honshu and Kyushu. -Starting March 26, 2016, you’ll be able to take the bullet train from Tokyo to Shin-Hakodate-Hokuto in Hokkaido in just over 4 hours.-You can get a great view of Mt.Fuji along the Tokaido Shinkansen route—sit on the right side of the train heading towards Kyoto, … Travelling by Japan’s shinkansen, or bullet trains, is a must-do for visitors to Japan. Capable of reaching a maximum speed of 320kms per hour, the bullet train offers riders an exceptionally unique and efficient travel experience. Japan has an extensive and efficient train network; however, without an intimate knowledge of the system, its complexity can make it difficult to figure out an efficient route. It was originally built and operated by the government-owned Japanese National Railways and has been part of the private Japan Railways Group since 1987.

In recent years, however, it has often become a slang expression for any passenger train that reaches high speeds. Travel at your own pace with unlimited freedom to explore Japan. Railway lines often pass close to residential buildings in metropolitan areas. Today, the network covers 2,765 km throughout Japan, with the Tokyo to Osaka Tokaido Shinkansen line remaining the busiest route. The Shinkansen high-speed trains, known in English as bullet trains, may reach a speed of 320 km/h and offer punctuality, safety and comfort. Heavily admired by the nation, the shinkansen run at an average 300 kmh (186 mph).