How Science Figured Out the Age of Earth ... for our present concept of an expanding universe. The current best direct measurement of the Hubble constant is 73.8 km/sec/Mpc (give or take 2.4 km/sec/Mpc including, both random and systematic errors), corresponding to a 3% uncertainty. Based on the latest results, the Hubble Constant is believe to be 73 km/s/Mpc. We now know this was incorrect. For example 6 billion years ago, when the universe was 7.5 billion years old, the Hubble constant was about 100 (km/s)/Mpc, what means the Hubble time was 9.78 billion years. ... it is reasonable to combine information to get the best estimate of parameters. When the universe is 24 billion years of age, H will be 60 (km/s)/Mpc, and the Hubble time will be 16.3 billion years. At present the Hubble constant gives a universe age of around 13.5 to 14 billion years. This is because the age of the universe is such a large number and therefore, difficult to estimate exactly.

There are two ways to get clocks to disagree: the twin paradox and gravitational time dilation.

In order to estimate the age of the universe, we must allow for changes in the rate of expansion.

Current estimates range from 12 to 24 billion years. The expansion of the Universe was first proposed by Georges Lemaître in 1927, he also suggested an estimated value of the rate of expansion, now called the Hubble Constant.

There are varying opinions on the actual age of the universe. The “current best estimate” for the age of the Solar system comes from a dating of CAIs consistent with several chronometers, 4567.2 +/- 0.5 Ma bp or +/- 0.011 %. It’s an incredible feat of science. The Hubble constant (H 0) is one of the most important numbers in cosmology because it can be used to estimate the size and age of the Universe.

My best estimate for the age of the universe is 13 and a half billion years. Hubble also calculated a value for the Hubble Constant just two years later, he put it at around 500 km/s/Mpc. So, the time it has taken for the galaxies to reach their current separations is t = D / v. But, from Hubble's Law, we know that v = H 0 D. So, t = D / v = D / (H 0 × D) = 1 / H 0. The age of the universe is defined by the reciprocal of the Hubble constant. Not even close to the age of the universe. Considering that our best estimates for the age of the universe are only accurate to within 20 million years or so (0.1% relative error), a few dozen millennia here and there doesn’t make any difference. We can easily estimate the age of the universe if we assume that the universe has always been expanding at the current rate. So, you can take 1 / H 0 as an estimate for the age of the Universe. When the universe is 24 billion years of age, H will be 60 (km/s)/Mpc, and the Hubble time will be 16.3 billion years. Adjusting for all of this, the value of the age of the universe becomes 13.7 billion years plus or minus 0.2 billion years, which is pretty darn close to our very simple calculation from before. For example 6 billion years ago, when the universe was 7.5 billion years old, the Hubble constant was about 100 (km/s)/Mpc, what means the Hubble time was 9.78 billion years. Easy!

Your question was "How do I calculate the age of the Universe?" With the combinations of things we have today, however, we can confidently state 13.81 billion years is the age of the Universe, with a very small uncertainty. What is the best estimate for the age of the universe What is best estimate for from SIO 35 at University of California, San Diego Estimate the age of the universe!

... the age of the Universe, or (b) the age of the corresponding objects. Not even close to the age of the universe. Florian Cajori, author of the 1908 article “The Age of the Sun and the Earth,” was a … After allowing for these effects, astronomers estimate that all of the matter within the observable universe was concentrated in an extremely small volume 13.8 billion years ago, a time we call the Big Bang.

The Hubble constant indicates the rate at which the Universe is currently expanding, so although it is called a ‘constant’ it changes with time. The currently best estimate of the age of Universe, as deduced, e.g., from measurements of the Cosmic Microwave Background, is 13,700 million years.The new …

To estimate the age of the universe, we need to measure The rate of expansion of the universe (H0) and the total matter and energy density of the universe What is our current best estimate for the age of the universe since the start of the Big Bang?