A tsunami may travel thousands of kilometers at several hundred kilometers an hour before losing its energy. Tsunami Historical Series: Aleutian Islands - 1946 Description On April 1, 1946 at 4:28 am (12:28 UTC), an 8.6 moment magnitude earthquake struck off the coast of Unimak Island in Alaska’s Aleutian Islands, generating a tsunami that caused the greatest damage and number of deaths in Hawaii’s history, leading to the creation of the United States’ first tsunami warning system. Case in point, Hilo Bay (pictured below) received wave heights reaching 35 feet during a May 1960 tsunami that struck the Islands, while other areas of Hawaii reported wave heights of 3 to 17 feet.

... 1946: Hilo, Hawaii (1946 Aleutian tsunami) MacDonald, and D.C. Cox, Bulletin of the Scripps Institute of Oceanography of the University of California, Vol. More than 150 persons were killed principally by drowning, and at least 161 others were injured. Shepard, G.A. The 1946 Aleutian Islands earthquake occurred near the Aleutian Islands on April 1, 1946, and generated a Pacific-wide tsunami. I did not know much about tsunamis. The April 1, 1946 tsunami, triggered by a magnitude 7.8 earthquake in the Aleutian Islands off Alaska, killed a total of 159 people on the big island. The only thing I knew about tsunamis was when I was a little boy about 8 years old. World's biggest tsunamis. And what happens to islands and shorelines in its path? Memorial to 1946 Tsunami victims at Laupahoehoe Point Park, Laupahoehoe, The Big Island, Hawaii, USA (For Editorial Use Only) Tital wave memorial in Lapahoehoe honoring 1946 victims of tsunami Kukuihaele, Hawaii - A tsunami warning siren above the Waipi'o Valley on the Big Island of Hawaii. 6, pp. The magnitude 8.1 earthquake caused 165 casualties.

Hawaii experienced at least one damaging tsunami every 12 years between 1837 and 1975—but none causing any significant damage in the last 35 years. We … The tsunami which devastated the shores of the Hawaiian Islands on April 1, 1946, was caused by a movement of the sea bottom on the northern slope of the Aleutian Trough, south of Unimak Island. There have also significant tidal waves in 1960 and 1975, according to Roy Daimaru, a docent at the Pacific Tsunami Museum, located in Hilo. ... 1946 triggered a tsunami which caused the death of 165 people and caused more than $26 million in damage. Downtown Hilo after the 1946 tsunami, illustrating damage to the makai (ocean) side of Kamehameha Avenue. 5, No. Remembering the Hilo Tsunami of 1946. Down the hill you go to the Keanae Peninsula, where taro fields still abound and Aunty Sandy’s banana … 1946 Tsunami destroys Hakalau Mill, railroad bridges, flumes and the Port of Hilo As a result of the tsunami, sugar production was drastically reduced in 1946, 10,595 tons instead of … Wave heights reached an estimated 115 feet in Alaska, and averaged 30 feet in Hawaii, where the tsunami struck without warning nearly 5 hours after the earthquake. Photo taken from the second story of Hilo Dry Goods towards Mo’oheau Park. The tsunami which struck the shores of the Hawaiian Islands on the morning of April 1, 1946, was the most destructive, and one of the most violent, in the history of the Islands.

Memorial to 1946 Tsunami victims at Laupahoehoe Point Park, Laupahoehoe, The Big Island, Hawaii, USA (For Editorial Use Only) Tital wave memorial in Lapahoehoe honoring 1946 victims of tsunami Kukuihaele, Hawaii - A tsunami warning siren above the Waipi'o Valley on the Big Island of Hawaii. Pararas-Carayannis, George and Calebaugh P.J., Catalog of Tsunamis in Hawaii, Revised and Updated , World Data Center A for Solid Earth Geophysics, NOAA, 78 p., March 1977. The waves traveled southward to Hawaii with an average speed of roughly 490 miles an hour, a wave length of nearly 100 miles, and a height in the open sea which is thought to have been 2 feet or less. Posted on May 11, 2009 by Damon Gabriel Manning is no longer with us… however, his son Darrel is posting memories of Gabriel and I will be posting some of his words on my blog this week and beyond: Gabriel Manning 1916-2008. 391-528, issued March 24, 1950; 27 Hours Adrift: Surviving the 1946 April Fool's Day tsunami (Laupahoehoe) On This Day In 1946, The Unthinkable Happened In Hawaii Damage on Kamehameha Avenue and Nawahi Lane in downtown Hilo. The Hilo tsunami of 1946 devastated parts of Hawaii, ruining property, claiming many lives, and leaving survivors homeless. "The Tsunami of April 1, 1946", by F.P.